Talking with communities about engagement

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Welcome to the Calgary community association engagement site!


Stage 1 is now closed!

Thank you to everyone that participated in this first stage. I have reached out to the selected communities and will be starting the interview process in June.

On this site we will be exploring your community's experience in community engagement. The goal of the research is to create a community engagement toolkit that will support your community association when faced with urban planning and development projects needing engagement.

The project began by having participants complete the interview selection form. This form was used to determine which communities to involve in the Stage 2 interviews. If your community was not selected for Stage 2, we will look to have you involved during the Stage 3 workshops!

The intention for the research is to understand how information on a planning and development project was received and the conversations that took place in your community about that project. There are many different ways how information can be shared, as well as received, and it is important to find a balance to ensure that community members are given the equal opportunities to participate in public engagement as it relates to urban planning projects impacting their communities.

If you have a story to share, questions to ask the researcher, or would like to start a discussion, please use the tabs below to provide your feedback. All information gathered will be used for research purposes.

The research for this project has been approved by the CFREB (REB20-1552).

I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the people of the Treat 7 region in Southern Alberta, which includes the Blackfoot Confederacy (comprising the Siksika, Piikani, and Kainai First Nations), as well as the Tsuut'ina First Nation, and the Stoney Nakoka (including the Chiniki, Bearspaw, and Wesley First Nations). The City of Calgary is also home to Metis Nation of Alberta, Region 3. I would also like to note that the University of Calgary is situated on land adjacent to where the Bow River meets the Elbow River, and that the traditional Blackfoot name for this place is "Moh'kins'tsis", which we now call the City of Calgary.



Welcome to the Calgary community association engagement site!


Stage 1 is now closed!

Thank you to everyone that participated in this first stage. I have reached out to the selected communities and will be starting the interview process in June.

On this site we will be exploring your community's experience in community engagement. The goal of the research is to create a community engagement toolkit that will support your community association when faced with urban planning and development projects needing engagement.

The project began by having participants complete the interview selection form. This form was used to determine which communities to involve in the Stage 2 interviews. If your community was not selected for Stage 2, we will look to have you involved during the Stage 3 workshops!

The intention for the research is to understand how information on a planning and development project was received and the conversations that took place in your community about that project. There are many different ways how information can be shared, as well as received, and it is important to find a balance to ensure that community members are given the equal opportunities to participate in public engagement as it relates to urban planning projects impacting their communities.

If you have a story to share, questions to ask the researcher, or would like to start a discussion, please use the tabs below to provide your feedback. All information gathered will be used for research purposes.

The research for this project has been approved by the CFREB (REB20-1552).

I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional territories of the people of the Treat 7 region in Southern Alberta, which includes the Blackfoot Confederacy (comprising the Siksika, Piikani, and Kainai First Nations), as well as the Tsuut'ina First Nation, and the Stoney Nakoka (including the Chiniki, Bearspaw, and Wesley First Nations). The City of Calgary is also home to Metis Nation of Alberta, Region 3. I would also like to note that the University of Calgary is situated on land adjacent to where the Bow River meets the Elbow River, and that the traditional Blackfoot name for this place is "Moh'kins'tsis", which we now call the City of Calgary.

If you have a question, let us know!

Have a question or concern? Please send it our way! We will respond to all questions within 3 business days. 

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    Is there a template that CA's can use for when engaging their communities?

    Bushell asked 3 months ago

    This is definitely something we can explore during this process. I think it is important for the community to have the right information in order to make informed decisions. It starts by educating them about the process and the impacts of the project! 

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    Why is the city not doing a bigger job to educate and inform residents of the Guidebook and the implication of the Municipal Development Plan? It will be passed and rolled out and people will say they were never told.

    Bushell asked 4 months ago

    Education is of the utmost importance! If the public is unaware or unknowing of what's going on, how are they to react or provide comment? 

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    How do you get the community wanting to engage?

    Bushell asked 3 months ago

    I say this is the million dollar question. We have to look at when people become invested in a project and understand why. 

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    How can we increase the level of people's interest in their community? It always seems like only seems like people get interested when there is a "hot topic" (e.g. golf course development, traffic changes, etc.) How do we show the value of a community association in bringing people together to make where they live better?

    Bushell asked about 2 months ago

    This is a great question that I hope we can explore in the Stage 3 Workshops!